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how vitally dependent the country is on a trained, educated, likable, young adult population. we have not quite recognized the deficit we have. as for the state level, a lot has happened. we work at the state level. we attempt to put together coalitions that recognize the importance of educating kids from conception to kindergarten. we are finding more business people who get the reality. they are understanding the situation and are increasingly ready to take action. in the area lisa pointed to, educating early solves educational problems. we published a report last march. it is on the website. it is a way to reduce special education costs. we know quality pre-kindergarten provided to 100 kids yields in reduction in special education costs alone enough to pay for the services. at the state level, there is an understanding that takes place that people can act on. it can better be done on the school district level. the power of technology is enabling people at local levels to act in ways they cannot at the federal level. as they act at the local and state level, it becomes clear that th
of the worst academic test scores in the country. what do you think should be done to better the educational system? >> i think that is an important question, especially for our economy. i want to point out one thing. she posed for sequestration and now says it will not happen. can you imagine that kind of leadership? she goes for the fiscal cliff and now she says it will not happen. let's talk about education. this is the problem i see. we have a department of education in washington. they have 3500 employees that make over $100,000 a year. they are dictating to the school district how to do their jobs. i think that is a shame and it is wrong. i am not talking about closing down the department of education. i have never said that and never will. can we reduce the size of that department of education and get that money down to the school district? i believe the best education for children in nevada comes between parents, teachers, and principles. -- principals. those are who should be making the decisions. >> if i could quickly comment. my opponent mentioned my vote on sequestration. just a
, but a nonprofit, a charity in its filing with the irs saying its mission is education. which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot, too. >> in wisconsin, i cannot take anything of value from a lobbyist. i cannot take a cup of coffee. at alec, it is the opposite. you are wined and dined for days in order to hear about the special legislation. the head of shell oil fluid on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one of the largest utility companies was on the panel. he is presenting to legislators. they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate needs and special interest-dom and in meetings with legislators. >> the united states of alec. we will return to the special report by bill moyers in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we turn to part two of "the united states of alec." a special report by bill moyers airing this week on lawyers in company, but premiering today of here on "democracy now!" >> the most important business hap
of quality in a child care setting is the training and education of the workforce, if we can up the bar on that. i think there's a lot that can be done. i think that, as far as quality is concerned -- you have about 28 states with a quality rating system. that is a really good thing. it is tough to be a parent. what questions do you ask? what do you look for? i think every parent wants the warm person who is going to be friendly and nice and you can click with because you want somebody who will love your children, but at the same time, the expectation should be if you are in a business with children, there should be other criteria. you should not have a history of violent offenses, so you would be no harm to the child. you should have some minimum training so that what you are doing can nurture the children and, hopefully, put them in a situation better ready to succeed when they start school. unfortunately, as i said, what we have seen from our studies is that is not happening. i want to end with one other thing it is called parents and the high costs of child care. we are not where we
change these patterns are educating parents and use that getting drunk on the weekends is neither healthy, cool, nor an expected part of american culture. let me talk about treatment for drug use. in to the and 11, 21.6 million people aged 12 and older, that is 8.4%, it needed treatment for an illicit drug problem. of those only 2.3 million receive treatment at a special the facility. often, the reason for not seeking treatment include lack of coverage or an inability to afford it. while we have a long journey ahead with regard to prevention and treatment, the good news is we are embarking on a time when we are to the accessibility to achievement for the affordable care act, after parity disorder services, and we are actively working on quality treatment .hrough samhsa's efforts again, i want to thank you all for your interest today. and thank you for helping us to spread the message of recovery. i will turn the microphone back to dr. clark. >> thank you, pam hyde. since his appointment, r. gil kerlikowske has been a driving force in implementing the policy. he coordinates all aspects of
girls getting educated. we provide freeducation to over 350 girls. i think it's like a fire that will grow. every year, my hope becomes more. i think i can see the future. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "early start weekend." >> i believe she should resign, yes. >>> a top lawmaker calling for a u.s. ambassador to resign. we have reaction to the new intelligence report that the benghazi attack that killed four americans was an act of terror. >>> abortion, gun policy, the war on drugs. some of these social issues shaping the presidential race. all morning, we put them in focus. >> i can see in his face that there was a lot more to her story than even what she was willing to let on. >>> women hold up half the sky. the message of a new documentary from "new york times" columnist. in an interview exclusive with cnn he sits down with celebrities. >>> saturday, september 29th, i'm deb feyerick. >> good to have you with us this morning. we are starting with the new revelations on the deadly attack in libya. >> the attack that killed chris stevens and three other
calling williams -- colleen williams? >> what is the one thing we can do to improve education in this country? >> i have served over 15 years on different school boards. it plans to stand the importance of education. it works best on the local level, works best when you have board members and parents involved, a community in fall, and many have at decatur's involved. when of the mistakes that has been made at that federal level is the passage of the no child left behind act. it started out with good intentions, but if has not accomplished what it should have. it has taken educators at of the classroom, and we need to keep educators in the classroom if they are going to address the needs of students. important thing is to make sure these kids arrive in kindergarten ready to learn. if they are behind, they will never catch up. i will not win a nobel prize for making that discovery. the rhetoric of senator fischer and her proposals to not add up. her budget proposal will result in deep cuts both your early childhood education and head start. it is a fact. i am not exaggerating. i
, i don't know why the men would want to hurt them. that's because he had been educated by women and encouraged, from the first moment and nurtured by a women who was empowered and he was able to see the world through a completely different lens. that's why it's about empowering the women to impact the men. it's not that the men are inherently the problem. unfortunately, they've been raised in a culture that hasn't encouraged them to see the world. >> what a remarkable spirit changing the world and changing men one at a time. >>> next hour, actress gabrielle union tells us about meeting a 15-year-old girl in vietnam who stunned her with extraordinary courage. turning oppression into opportunity for women worldwide is going to air on pbs on monday and tuesday. >>> there is more positive news on the home front, if you're in the market to sell. home prices on the rise for the third straight month. we'll tell you where. like myself... ing i had pain in my pelvic area... and bleeding that wasn't normal for me. she said i had to go to the doctor. turned out i had uterine cancer, a type
an education, despite no other virtue then we were born here. nobody deserves to be an american. nobody held a contest and said you were okay, you deserve it, you get to be an american. by the grace of god, we are americans. but this little guy was born into one of the worst environments possible, into a country where you will probably starve to death and get cholera and a bunch of other diseases, probably. if not, you might get maimed. so you might have this. okay, i went to bed hungry a few times because i was born to a teenage mother. okay, my life was pretty bad. let me tell you something. nobody cared -- nobody here has had a really bad. this guy has it bad. now he is laying their dying because his right foot is blowing off, his other foot is partially blown off. he had gangrene and he is dying a slow and miserable death. of course, being an american, what we want to do? we want to help the kid. but do i really want to help the kid -- i'm running a safe house. i am in the middle of baghdad territory, i am risking the lives of my agents if i help this young man because that is not my job
's a provocative new approach to education called grit, meant to give kids just that. >> it's really about how do you get kids actually to not only experience failure but recognize that those hard moments are the keys to future success. >> i would say i don't trust anyone who hasn't failed. >> right, right. >>> and kate snow reports on a man who learned his quirks were much more than just odd behavior. >> i would silently freak out. >> and turn to a very unlikely teacher for help. >> i have been in therapy now for 16 years. >> you have literally studied howard stern? >> yeah. >>> plus one big secret of jon stewart's success on "the daily show." >>> and how the fifty shades novels have saved a tiny town in maine. >> so the big question is, have you read it? >> you said you weren't going to ask me that question. >> i was lying. >> all that and more on "rock center with brian williams." >>> good evening, and welcome. right now, as of tonight, 1.4 million of our fellow citizens are serving on active duty in the u.s. military. they're serving domestically and all over the world, and after a decade of
this story with the world. you wouldn't know it to look over here, but public education is our most pressing political, social and moral problem. everybody knows it, and positions are entrenched, and there's a lot of hot rhetoric on all sides. somehow we've gotten to a point where frustration has built to such a fever pitch, that we've turned on teachers as the villains and started shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer after a good story to tell, i went looking in the pressure cooker of a public high school working against the clock to raise test scores. i wanted to take a look at what we're throwing away in this big national purge. instead, i found a dynamic principle leading a -- principal, leading a group of passionate, dedicated teachers at a school with a proud tradition to rally the community around. i found a scramble to help a surprisingly savvy group of kids who have been largely abandoned by the system. um, as most of you probably know, the book traces the pivotal 2009-2010 school year at reagan high, and we've been -- weaved in a lot of its history. not all, but
to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. and put some in the had a lot. >>> the worst the house minicabs are there. there's one right behind them purities problem of wall street executive. >>> is a really the heart to get a taxi and your city? not a lot going on it would clear as you had towards the pickets on the bay bridge as you said in the san francisco. right now in the heart of the things are clear. sematech a bridge looking clear. free-form in all directions. the dump our bridge also much better used to report. all directions are clear. if you're heading to san francisco cleared 40 minutes from 580 to the golden gate bridge toll plaza. 82 to 37 connecter looks pretty good to list warrants are provincial or 645 this morning. the to see drug comes around that area or green. a 80 looking good as world no. run as you had towards the maze. som
for educators and districts to make better decisions and help get evidence in a way, and in some ways that type of tool would make what they're trying to do a lot easier. >> thank you. >> i think you are the designated responder here. >> first of, it's great to get to the panel. it's fab it's aic. it there are so many good points to bring in the paper. i'm not going to spend time addressing all of them. afterwards i would like follow up with each you. it's going to make it better and stronger for for one note in the add yins you'll be on a panel like this what was life like before the app store. it they'll be shocked when you ask the question, not because you old but because they can't imagine what life was like before the app store. what you are seeing is incredible. where the imeerps and companies come from? what it is about transparency about you're getting. that's yew it's out there. you can count the things on your tablet and smartphone. we want to take the entrepreneurial innovation and use it to give teachers better tools in the classroom. that's what. the consumer report for educational
-bedroom houses. that is a normal neighborhood and talk about how they are concerned about education and health care and they go down the list. my dad used to have an expression. whenever we would come up to him and say, joe, i tell you what i value. he will look to my father and say, do not tell me what you value. show me your budget and i will tell you what you value. show me what your -- show me your budget, i will tell you what about you. [applause] let's take a look at how much they value the middle-class. they have already passed one in the house of representatives, the one embraced by governor romney. look at what it has done. i care about the middle class but i will cut 90 million people -- 19 million people off of medicare. a lot of people say, that is all poor folks. a million of those people are seniors. in fact majority had to sell -- the vast majority of folks had to sell everything they have and whatever savings they had to get into a nursing home. the only reason they are able to get into a nursing home is because of something called the dueled eligible. the get both medicare and
, a viewer wants a little bit more from you on education. they write: i agree r agree with some of governor johnson's point but the view of education is backwards. do you want to clarify your education policy? >> guest: well, as governor of new mexico, i was more outspoken than any governor in the country regarding school choice. i really believe that to reform education we need bring competition to public education. that said, what's the best thing that the federal got could do to improve education in this country? well, i maintain it would be to abolish the federal department of education, established in 1979 under jimmy carter, there is anything from 1979 to suggest that the department of education has been value-add? i would argue know. the federal government gives each state 11 cents out of every cool that the state spends but they tell you have to do a, b, c, and d, and here's 11 cents, and when to accomplish a, b, c, and d, it costs 16 cents. so nobody really recognizes it costs money to take federal money. just get the federal department over education out of education. just get the
involved, because we're trying to get their money. >> it is a matter of public education, and that is where groups like dave's and other organizations that are trying to beat the drums to get americans to understand what is going on, is that what you feel is most important, educational? >> the first thing, in our country, if i had three wishes -- a strong, moral, ethical base. i had that growing up in the depression. a strong family unit in every home. now the divorce rate is over 50%, right? that is destabilizing. when i grew up in the depression of all times, we had the finest public schools in the world and the one thing a democracy must have is a well- educated population. our public schools are at the bottom of the industrialized world. that is the country. the great state of texas, where i went to schools and had an incredible education, is either 47 or 40 night in the 50 states. that is all our responsibility and we can correct that, but with these problems we face now, that is so fundamental about what we must do now, and we cannot pass that off to a house or senate or the state or
'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number.
opportunities in the millions of chinese students eager for a foreign education. nhk world reports. >> translator: it is the first time these institutions more than 40 of them have held a joint seminar. >> translator: i want to enroll in a prestigious american university because the quality is high. >> potential is ver hiy high especially for undergraduate students. this is one of the main goals is to recruit more undergraduate students. >> many chinese student are keen on studying at foreign universities. and if they can't, make it overseas to study, overseas universities are coming to them. for example, the missouri state university, a u.s. institution, provides classes on the campus of a university in china. all classes are in english. at what temperature does water freeze? what would you tell me? chinese students earn the same degrees as the university students in the u.s. more than 2,000 chinese have graduated from here. since classes started six years ago. she hopes to join them. she is a senior, studying business administration, and accounting. li comes from inland china and
or blackmail our allies and friends. i want to make sure the education system fulfills its hope and promise. i've had a strong record of working with democrats and republicans in texas to make sure no child is left behind. i understand the limited role of the federal government, but it could be a constructive role when it comes to reform, by insisting that there be a strong accountability systems. my intentions are to earn your vote and earn your confidence. i'm asking for your vote. i want you to be on my team. and for those of you working, thanks from the bottom of my heart. for those of you making up your mind, i would be honored to have your support. >> vice president gore, two minutes. >> i want to thank everybody who watched and listened tonight because this is indeed a crucial time in american history. we're at a fork in the road. we have this incredible prosperity, but a lot of people have been left behind. and we have a very important decision to make. will we use the prosperity to enrich all of our families and not just a few? indeed a crucial time in american history. we're at a for
education to cost that much? >> no, i didn't expect it to cost that much. when i originally started, i was just pursuing what i wanted to do in school and what my passion was. >> reporter: her student loan debt began to pile up when she enrolled in a $30,000-a-year private college. that was unaffordable. so she transferred here to brooklyn college, a public institution, where annual tuition is just over $5,000. >> it does put a little bit of a pressure to want to make sure i get that good-paying job to make sure i can pay these loans back. >> reporter: one in ten families has student loan debt now owes nearly $62,000, $7,000 more than just three years earlier. total u.s. student loan debt has surpassed $1 trillion. while student debt is rising, average starting salary for college grads have gone up only slightly to just over $44,000. when of with the degrees you have, what are the starting salaries for the position? >> anywhere from 50 to 60 starting. >> reporter: brothers enters the job market next year. right now he's earning enough with her part-time job at the student center to kee
in education. that investment is not limited to more money. it also means getting parents involved. it also means expecting more from everybody along whole education ecosystem, from administrators to policy-makers to teachers come expecting more out of everyone. so what i have on the table in san antonio is basically a 1/8 cent sales tax that will cost the median household in the city $7.81 per year. mind you, every day in texas, it cost $359.81 to keep a juvenile incarceration. what we have on the table is the opportunity to educate more than 22,404-year-olds with -- 22,400 4-year-olds with high quality pre-k. >> i don't believe that taxes are inherently evil. >> that will be tweeted, by the way. [laughter] give them a second. [laughter] >> i do believe that taxes are inherently evil. i'd like them and nobody likes the impaired but it will the voters in san antonio that there is no way to sugarcoat this. i am asking you for this tax increase. more than that, i believe in you. i believe that may put it in front of you, you can make a decision as to whether or not you want to make this inves
in education, the goal was not just to build a dam, not just to build a school, but to improve the capacity, to build the capacity, of the potential government. when you talk to most pakistanis, you say, you give it to who? but it is worth it. we work with the government of pakistan. i would argue it is a failure. not a total failure. i think they got some results and continued to. it was a failure in the vision that we would build the kind of partnership with pakistan, with a capable pakistan that we wanted. those of you who read the book, and those of you who have not should not be in this room, will understand and buy that premise, as i do, that with a very weak state and a strong society, the problem with putting all of that commitment into that week state is flawed. if there are not so many beggars in pakistan, but because of social, tribal, and local structures, it is worth paying attention to the fact that that is the way pakistan is governed and investing in the prospects for a strong state with a state in that situation is fraught with risk. that risk happened. that is one flaw in
was a leader in education funding. erika derry: and the fact that california isn't making it a priority frustrates me. dan hurd: i'm ashamed of that, and i don't want this to continue for my daughter. brenda kealing: prop 38 is going to bring a lot of money to our schools. suzan solomon: the money stays at the school site. cade derry: what i would really like to see is that the teachers... that were laid off come back to the school. navaz hurd: a smaller class size. navaz hurd: as a mom i want that. as a teacher i want that. prop 38 is an opportunity of a generation. both: we're the fruit guys! back in 1998, we had this idea to deliver fresh fruit to offices in downtown san francisco. we built these wooden crates, filled these with fruit in my one-bedroom apartment. the fruit guys has been with bank of america since they first started. we work with them to help them grow and succeed. we're coming up on 50 employees and delivering to thousands of companies every week. i would definitely say this is a fruitful business. >>> the power of nature is on display when winds from a typhoon pick
jobs outdate faster and spin off new jobs. and they each one requires more education. and i just think if we're going it i think america is a huge advantage in the world. because the i think the world is going to be divided going forward between high imagination and enabling countries and low imagination enabling country. rethe highest imagination enabling country in the world. if you have spark of an idea you can go to delta in taiwan they'll design it. they'll get you a cheap chinese manufacture. amazon will gift wrap it for christmas. free lancer get the logo. they are commodities except this. that's no country that does better. the problem with this though, the days will ford will move to your job with 25,000 person factory is over. it's 2500 people and a lot of robots and you know the old joke, the modern factory of the future is two employees, a man and the dog. the man is there to feed the dog and the dog there to keep the man away from the machines. generating 12 million nor jobs maybe it's possible only going to be possible if we once again get everyone starting something. so
professional and educational goals. he will receive $500,000 and he can spend that money anyway he wants. >>> right now 6:18, we will check in with sal for a look at traffic. sal? >>> things are getting busier as you head out the door and let's take a look at the freeway. you can see traffic is going to be busy especially getting to emory i will have aen when you get to the bay bridge, metering lights are turned on and it is backed up beyond the 880 over crossing and we have another tight day at the crossing. dumbarton bridge looks good and so far so good it looks good to gilroy to morgan hill, nice looking drive to san jose and sunny veil. let's go to steve. >>> no breeze yet, she said how can i look great when it is this hot. julie, you look fabulous, don't worry. >> it is warm in many inland locations. there is no delta breeze, 70s and 80s near 100s inland and that sea breeze comes in later. 65 and 66 in hayward, this is rare occasion, no sea breeze anywhere. nothing has happened yesterday. you see the low coming up and once it cops in that wind will kick in and it is a very mild morn
the chance to get a great education and get the skills they need to compete. that is the third part of my plan. education is the only reason i am standing here today. son of a single mom. it is the only reason michelle got a chance. the question is are we going to give that opportunity to everybody. right now there are millions of students who are paying less for college because we took away billions of dollars going to banks and we said let's give them directly to students. [applause] so now you have got a choice. we can gut investments in education like governor romney wants to do to pay for tax breaks for the wealthy. [boos] don't boo, vote. or we can decide that no child should have at their dream deferred because of overcrowded classrooms. no family should set aside a college acceptance letter because they don't have the money. no company should have to look to some other country because they cannot find the workers with the right skills here at home. nevada, i wanted, recruit thousands of new math and science teachers, improve early education, create 2 million more slots in communit
medicare, cuts to education and tax cuts to the rich, he's been very forceful about contrasting his views on things with what he says are the views to the other side which are sort of embracing a host of unpopular positions to these constituencies he's mobilizing the debates and had success with it and police tried to paint romney as an out of touch equity guide working-class person of the team that it's been fairly successful strategy particularly but only with the base but white working-class voters to be competitive in this election the obama team realized correctly there is a very off-putting thing about romney which is embodied in the republican party these days, but romney doesn't particularly without saying a word of the republican performance. it has been designed to optimize the things they might say that what really ticked off the base for the democratic party and raise concerns among independent voters. they probably couldn't have done much better captured by the elements that are far away by the level of conservatism and social issues, paul business of corrupting paul ryan and
.t.e.-type speeds, i don't have any problem. if you're in the educational context and talking about mobile smart phone and a lot of this access of broadband, in minority communities in particular, i don't view that as an acceptable -- accept table replacement. >> david cohen on telecommunications monday at 8:00 eastern on c-span 2. >> first lady michelle obama was in wisconsin friday at this campaign stop in appleton. this was her second visit to wisconsin in a little more than a month. it's half an hour. [cheers] >> thank you so much! yes, i'm very excited to be with you all today. i want to start by thanking eli for that very kind introduction for everything he's doing for this campaign. i want to thank a couple of -- one more person as well. i want to recognize former senator russ feingold. [cheers] thank you for everything you've done for this state and everything that he's doing for the campaign here in wisconsin. and most of all, i want to thank all of you, especially all the students here at lawrence university. thanks for being here. yes! yes! now, you all seem pretty fired up and ready
. that is 100% incorrect. people need to educate themselves on how congress works. he had 60 votes until august when tent kennedy died. -- ted kennedy. then he had 59. a special election seat was triggered, the election with scott brown, that gave the republicans 41. then we lost senator byrd. that was another vote that we lost. so the president only had a senate for about eight months. in that eight months he was dealing with the worst recession since the great depression. so people need to educate themselves and stop going with these party lines of the democrats controlled congress two years and so on. there's only so much you can do. host: thanks for calling. this on twitter -- on facebook -- gary johnson will be on this program to take your calls in about an hour, 8:30 eastern time. the last call from texas reminds us of the interview with ross belprospero. -- with ross perot. richard spoke with him down in plano, texas. the headline, the u.s. is headed for disaster. the full interview with richard wolfe of "usa today" talking with perot, 9:00 p.m. eastern time. [video clip] >> do you think
. >> reporter: from there, romney turned to education policy at a forum sponsored by nbc news. >> we have proven that sending a lot of money to failed schools to pay the same teachers to do the same things will not make any difference. the real key is leadership in drawing the best and brightest to the profession, giving them the right incentives, promoting the very best, helping our students have discipline in the classroom, insisting on the participation of parents. >> reporter: the candidate new york city stop came as another poll. this one from the "washington post" found ohio swinging toward the obama column. no republican has won the white house without ohio. with that in mind, romney and running mate paul ryan began a bus tour through ohio this afternoon. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. supreme court upheld west virginia's congressional redistricting plan today. critics of the redistricting had argued that the populations within newly drawn districts were too far out of balance, but the supreme court reversed a lower court ruling and said the state legislatures was correct in trying to keep coun
. to be competitive in a global knowledge economy wisconsin needs to expand educational opportunity. this is our mission at the association. we also believe good government depends on an informed and educated public and that a debate can and should be educational. we have over 800,000 members in the state. we are pleased to join in sponsoring this 2012 u.s. senate debate. we appreciate you joining us this evening. join us this evening on our web site to find even more information about candidates and the issues this election season. we have seen our society and government faced growing challenges. we hope that our sponsorship of this senate debate will help you gain a better understanding on how each of these candidates would represent us and go for our nation. join us in watching the debate and in thinking about the future. join us on tuesday, november 6. the format will allow for each candidate to make an opening statement and respond to questions from >> the format will allow for each candidate to make an opening statement, to respond to questions from a panel and work -- a panel of reporters
nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and i
violence to keep girls from getting an education. it is here at razia jan opened her school to hundreds of young minds each and every day. >> in afghanistan, most of the girls have no voice. they are used as property of a family. the picture is very grim. my name is razia jan and i am a founder of a girls' school in afghanistan. when we opened the school in 2008, 90% of them could not write their name. today, 100% of them are educated. they can read, they can write. i lived in the u.s. for over 38 years, but i was really affected by 9/11. i really wanted to prove that muslims are not terrorists. i came back here in 2002. >> everybody. >> girls had been the most oppressed and i thought i have to do something. it was a struggle in the beginning. i would sit with these men and i would tell them, don't marry them when they're 14 years old. they want to learn. >> how do you write your father's name. after five years now, the men, they're proud of their girls. when they, themselves, can write their name. still, we have to take this with precautions. some people are so much against girls getti
extremists typically keep girls from getting an education. but one woman is braving that to help girls in kabul. and today, she is this week's cnn hero. >> in afghanistan, most of the girls have no voice. they are used as property of a family. the picture is very grim. i am the founder of a girl's school in afghanistan. when we opened the school in 2008, 90% of them could not write their name. today, 100% of them are educated. they can read and write. i lived in the u.s. for over 38 years, but i was really affected by 9/11. i really wanted to prove that muslims are not terrorists. i came back here in 2002. girls have been the most oppressed, and i thought i needed to do something. it was a struggle in the beginning. i sat with the men and said don't marry them when they're 14 years old. they want to learn. how do you write your father's name? after five yes, sars now, the m they are proud of their girls, when they themselves write their name. still, we have to proceed with caution. some people are so much against girls getting educated. we provide free education to over 350 girls. i th
private prisons, education to more recently military and security issues has been put outward with much rhetoric, but not a lot of evidence in terms of cost effect it has, for example. my question is simply, how much reflects a blind faith in the precepts of the marketplace and adam smith and how much is attached to corporations that will benefit them in the future? i've written a book on the subject with respect to military contractors with little purple evidence. >> i see the correlation is inverted. it is more expensive and you get less out of it. we have seen how well halliburton dead when they took over the logistics of the army. the army cannot feed itself anymore, which is kind of ridiculous. look at other scandals in iraq can you see these across the board. national security badges is what i did and at some point it struck me as overwhelming that these things were not working as the vonage had claimed they would work. and there are some things that not only because of cost effect of mass i don't want some contract to looking at sensitive surveillance intelligence. i don't want s
and educator. >> i mean there actually is extra credit for losing creatively if you are a current office holder. if you are a senator or governor and going to go back to that job then, in fact, there are ways if you lose you can lose and still retain your position, for example, as mccain does as a particular kind of voice within the context of the senate. but when you are as romney said many, many times in the primary, an unemployed guy, then what happens is you simply become sort of a speed bump in history. >> now, jeff, you followed a lot of campaigns. i'm sure you remember when people thought senator obama was losing. are people counting romney out too early and does that help him in any way? >> they're not counting him out of the obama campaign. the whole team in chicago and else where across the country is working really hard on their ground game. they want democrats not to feel overconfident, despite the fact that the polls are good, despite the fact that he's doing well in the swing states. they see this as a race that will be close and don't want their voters and supporters to forget th
, where we want to take the country in terms of health care and education. by the way, it's rich. george, you covered this race very carefully. governor romney, during the primary, vice -- vision rated his opponents, when his opponents complained, he stopped whining. he questioned the president on, making us a less christian nation. give me a break. you know, presidential campaigns are tough, but we're saying the truth about what governor romney wants to do. but that may be inconvenient. but, we're very confident with the case we're going to make proactively about the president. and how that contrasts with governor romney. >> the governor has shown that he can be tough in these debates as you pointed out. we're seeing some reports that he's preparing some zingers to get under the president's skin. how worried are you about that? >> i think the president views this as part of the entire campaign. you know, our convention, the events that we do in battleground states. the ads we're running. now, the debates. it's a chance to have a conversation with the american people about where we are a
education to health, personal relationships, and business, mobile technology is changing our world. cnn's our mobile society initiative is taking an in-depth look at these changes. for more go to cnn.com/rmobilesociety or visit the our mobile society section of the cnn mobile app. >>> well, the u.s. took a big lead into the final day of the ryder cup. did we hold on? we'll go live to illinois next. >>> you don't have to be in front of a television to watch cnn. you can stay connected, you can do it on your cell phone or you can do it from your computer at work. just go to cnn.com/tv. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! silverado! the most dependable, longest lasting, full-size pickups on the road. so, what do you think? [ engine revs ] i'll take it. [ male announcer ] it's chevy truck month. now during chevy truck month, get 0% ap
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